Dental Care Monthly Updates

NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS



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24/Jun/2019

Individuals who suffer from regular headaches may not realize that our oral health can have a direct impact on more than just our teeth. If you have frequent headaches that seem never to go away or return regularly, you may want to put aside your over-the-counter pain relief for a moment and consult with your dentist.

Cavity Size Doesn’t Effect Headache Frequency

In our craniums, there is a nerve called the trigeminal, which directly affects the sensations we feel in our teeth, nasal cavities, and some parts of our face. It also has involvement with the muscles of the mouth and jaw, which may cause an overlap in sensory information. With all of the different facial processes that it influences, it’s not uncommon for this overlap to result in a massive headache because of a small cavity somewhere in your mouth. Temperature sensitivity may turn into sensitive pain that encompasses your entire upper or lower jaw.

Many general dentists understand this complex neurological relationship but may refer you to an experienced oral and maxillofacial surgeon for treatment. OMF surgeons not only have the specialized training to address the issue but understand that everyone’s experience may have different symptoms for the same issue.

Advanced Tooth Decay Contributes to the Problem

Another contributing factor to the relationship between your oral health and recurrent headaches may have nothing to do with neurological complications at all. Tooth decay is one of the more likely culprits behind your discomfort because of the effects it has on your oral health.

Aggravating symptoms like inflammation, infection, uneven jaw pressure and alignment all add stress on your jaw and surrounding muscle which can result in throbbing head pains. Pay close attention for these symptoms in your mouth as they may indicate a larger dental complication you should have treated right away.

If you have aching teeth that need treatment you have put off for a while and now have developed regular headaches, you may have a serious infection that has spread. Infected teeth don’t just keep infections localized around it alone; pushing off critical dental care can transform a normally easily resolved health issue into a complicated problem that could cost even more to fix.

Other Causes of Dental-Related Headaches

Oral health and headaches go hand in hand more than many of us realize. Other factors that can contribute to headaches include:

If you thought that crossed nerves and tooth decay were the only ways that your oral health could influence your headaches, think again. Several dental appliances can help resolve many of these conditions, and sometimes just a short orthodontic plan or simply updating your current dentures may relieve these headaches once and for all. Occasionally, surgical options may offer the best solution, so speaking with a knowledgeable OMF surgeon about your condition is wise.

Stop Dental Headaches Today

You know your body better than anyone, and if you experience mild to severe headaches regularly, it’s essential to get appropriate treatment. Health studies have shown the significant impact our oral health has on the rest of our body, and seemingly minor mouth issues can lead to more severe problems later. Ask your regular dentist about speaking with an OMF provider today for further evaluation if nothing else is solving the issue.

Although there are many types of common issues that cause frequent headache pain, Union City Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is here to help eliminate those that stem from dental health problems. Having received recognition as one of New Jersey’s Top Dentists, you can have confidence in Dr. Nancy Herbst’s commitment to giving you an exceptional treatment experience with the newest technology available. Her more than 25 years of practice brings a depth of knowledge to your treatment plan that you can trust. To learn more about the different procedures we offer and to set up your consultation, please schedule online or call (201) 601-9262.


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24/Jun/2019

When considering whether to remove your wisdom teeth or not, it’s important to weigh the pros and cons while recognizing the long-term complications these teeth can bring. At first, wisdom teeth don’t appear to be an issue. Quietly hidden away in your gums, it’s easy to forget they are there. Over time, as we mature and grow into adulthood, the risk for impaction, infection, and periodontal disease increases. Think about the below problems that unremoved wisdom teeth can bring:

  • Swelling and pain in the jaw
  • Irritated, bleeding, swollen gums
  • Impaction into your tooth structures
  • Bad breath
  • Bone and/or gum loss

Top Five Reasons to Remove Wisdom Teeth

Symptoms of impacted wisdom teeth only highlight the larger dental issues and possible disease that may occur. There are many arguments in favor of having wisdom tooth extractions. Below, we highlight the top five reasons to remove your wisdom teeth:

Inflamed and infected gums and/or teeth. When there is limited space in your mouth for new teeth to breath through, impaction is a serious issue that may present itself. Gum disease and infection may develop and spread quickly under these conditions.  

Your mouth is overcrowded. Wisdom teeth have a difficult time erupting due to all the other teeth already in place within your mouth. This forceful and steady pressure may lead to misalignment and ruin your straight, beautiful smile.

They come in like a wrecking ball. Misalignment isn’t the only risk you face when these molars push their way into your mouth. It’s possible to experience bone loss or increased damage from cavities because of the infections, inflammation, or gaps their entrance cause.

Development of cysts and tumors. Tiny cysts and tumors may develop in the jawbone when a wisdom tooth becomes impacted. This creates joint pain and requires an experienced TMJ dental health professional to treat it.  

Cleanliness is difficult. Even if there is no obvious complication or pain after the eruption of these teeth, you may have future issues when cleaning them. Wisdom teeth rarely have a lot of room to work around, making it hard to brush or floss appropriately. This leads to poor hygiene in these tight locations of the mouth which creates a breeding ground for cavities and tartar.

Visit an Oral Surgeon in Union City

According to the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial (OMF) Surgeons, 9 out of 10 people experience an impacted wisdom tooth. The risk of persistent infections and jaw pain without wisdom tooth extraction is a serious decision to make. Before deciding against removal, speak with a reputable OMF surgeon about your wisdom teeth and current oral health situation.

Hundreds of people undergo wisdom tooth extraction every year to protect their smile and overall dental health. Dr. Nancy Herbst of Union City Oral Surgery brings her over 25 years of experience to her practice and offers her patients the best results possible by using the most up-to-date techniques available. Her recognized skill and training earned her the title of one of New Jersey’s top dentists in 2016. Contact our office today at (201) 601-9262 to schedule an examination and discuss your wisdom tooth treatment options.


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24/Jun/2019

There are many rituals and processes that humans share as they age: acne, awkward first dates, unpleasant hairstyles, and the removal of wisdom teeth. While not everyone needs their wisdom teeth cleared, by and large, most end up having to sit in the dentist’s chair and undergo oral surgery to have them removed.

For those who have been issued the command to have the teeth removed, they might not immediately understand why. The teeth aren’t decaying. They don’t feel any pain. So, what’s the point? The idea of oral surgery is nerve-wracking for most people, which is why it is vital to remember that dentists suggest the removal of wisdom teeth for a good reason. Here are a few of those reasons.

Reduced Space

One of the main reasons that dentists suggest removing wisdom teeth is lack of space in the jaw to support all of the teeth. When those wisdom teeth start to grow, they’re going to force the other teeth to shift. This can cause the teeth to become crooked and even overlap. For many who want to have the perfect smile, this isn’t an acceptable look. If an individual waits too long to have their wisdom teeth removed, they may be facing additional elements like braces. This is because the wisdom teeth already sprouted and forced the teeth to shift. They’ll require extra help to straighten their smile once more.

Pain

Another reason to have the wisdom teeth removed is that it’s going to cause a whole lot of unnecessary suffering. While the surgery itself isn’t the most comfortable, it’s nothing compared to the endless pain an individual will receive when a wisdom tooth is attempting to sprout through the gums and can’t because another tooth is blocking it.

Infection

Wisdom teeth can become infected. This can cause the entire area to become infected and may lead to gum disease and tooth loss. Because wisdom teeth don’t always sprout completely, they are often in danger of developing an infection from an oral bacteria known as pericoronitis. This bacteria can be painful and may even become dangerous.

It’s best to have the wisdom teeth removed and spare oneself the unnecessary pain and drama.

Know When to Get Your Wisdom Teeth Removed

A dentist can tell you when it’s time to remove your wisdom teeth, but only a dental surgeon can do the procedure. It’s important to pick a medical professional you feel comfortable with. At Union City Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, clients are our priority. Dr. Nancy Herbst, DDS has more than 25 years of experience helping patients with everything from wisdom tooth removal to dental implants. Call today at 201-601-9262 to speak to a professional about getting your wisdom teeth removed, or fill out our contact form.


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24/Jun/2019

Tooth sensitivity is a condition where you experience tooth pain or discomfort when eating or drinking cold foods like your favorite ice cream. This sensitivity may also present itself when brushing or flossing your teeth. Fortunately, this type of condition has many options for treatment which are easy and convenient.

Why Tooth Sensitivity Happens

Some tooth sensitivity involves your diet, but sometimes underlying dental problems may cause this condition. Here are a few possible reasons why your teeth are so sensitive, and what treatments might help.

Treatments for Tooth Sensitivity

It’s good news that sensitive teeth are usually easy to treat, and for many patients, switching toothpaste makes a big difference. Sometimes this isn’t the case, and in extreme cases where nothing helps the problem, further evaluation is necessary.

Only an evaluation by your dentist will determine the best solution for these severe instances. Below are some of the treatment options available:

Toothpaste for desensitizing teeth. There are a variety of toothpastes available that will help make teeth less sensitive by blocking pain. Many of these are found over-the-counter at your local store, and your dentist may recommend a particular brand.

Applying bonding to your teeth. When root surfaces get exposed by teeth grinding or cavities, application of a special resin to the exposed areas of a sensitive tooth may help. This desensitizing of your teeth brings long term pain relief.

Application of fluoride to the tender areas. Another option is a fluoride application to the sensitive spots on your teeth. This chemical strengthens tooth enamel which helps to reduce discomfort.

Receive a gum graft. If you have lost gum tissue due to age or lost teeth, suffering from sensitive tooth pain is a possible side effect. You may need an oral surgeon to perform a gum graft to correct the issue. Gum grafting helps to protect against sensitivity and exposing the root.  

Get a root canal. This is one of the most successful methods for stopping sensitivity in teeth. Dentists may refer you to an oral and maxillofacial (OMF) surgeon for this procedure if you experience severe pain and nothing else is successful.

Get Relief from Sensitive Teeth with an Oral Surgeon

Sensitive tooth pain is a condition that has many treatment options. If you are suffering from discomfort because of certain foods you eat or a larger dental issue, it’s important to get care right away. Make sure to find a dentist or OMF surgeon that has experience in this area of pain management and treatment.

Dr. Nancy Herbst of Union City Oral Surgery has over 25 years of experience helping patients deal with this type of sensitivity. Her practice offers the most up-to-date technology that creates an exceptional treatment experience. Contact our office today at (201) 601-9262 to learn more about this dental issue and what options may help you get relief.


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24/Jun/2019

Many people get headaches and don’t exactly know why. About 10 percent of the U.S. population experiences this sensation, according to the Mayo Clinic. If you’re suffering pains or migraines that seem to pop-up without cause, it may be time to go to the dentist. A significant portion of people find that teeth grinding is actually at the root of their headaches, migraines, and neck problems.

Your temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a hinge-like structure that connects your jaw to your skull. Repeatedly clenching your teeth because of stress, or because of a nervous chewing habit, can strain the small muscles around this joint, causing your head or neck to hurt.

What Is Bruxism?

Grinding or clenching teeth is known as bruxism. It affects up to 80 percent of the population. While the cause of bruxism isn’t precisely known, doctors believe that stress plays a large part in this habit. These activities happen at night, typically when a person is sleeping, leaving them unaware of the damage that they are doing to their mouths and bodies as a whole. Grinding is a sub-conscious quirk, like nail-biting. Most people have no idea that this is happening to them while they sleep.

The Effects of Grinding

There are both short-term and long-term effects of bruxism. For the former, experiencing headaches and migraines is common. These may be felt immediately when you wake up or occur at any point in the day. They are typically present after an episode of clenching and grinding.

Facial myalgia may also develop, which is an aching jaw and pain in the facial muscles. You may also build tinnitus, experience earaches, and have pain in your sinuses. Other examples of short-term effects include:

  • Stiff neck and shoulders
  • Tooth wear
  • Fractured teeth
  • Teeth mobility
  • Limited opening of the mouth
  • Receding and inflamed gums
  • Poor sleep quality
  • Broken fillings
  • Tongue scalloping

Long-term effects can be even more painful and worrisome. For one, you may develop consistent and frequent migraines, excessive facial muscle tone, or your jaw may become so dysfunctional that you develop Temporomandibular Joint Disorder. You may also notice a clicking or popping of your jaw and see substantial tooth wear and loss.

Treatments for Bruxism

There are quite a few treatments available to help with teeth grinding and clenching. The most popular and common is to use a mouth guard when you sleep. This keeps the teeth separated while you sleep, so they are unable to clench together.

The best thing to do is to visit an experienced dentist. They’re fully equipped to help you, no matter how big or small your problem is. There are a lot of different ways to treat this situation, but only a medical professional can tell you what method is right for you.

Visit a Trusted Oral Surgeon

Get relief from the side effects of teeth grinding by consulting a reputable New Jersey oral surgeon. It’s important to learn more about the underlying cause and treatment options available for your condition. A good action plan not only treats your bruxism but also helps reduce further damage to your teeth.

If you are suffering side effects from grinding your teeth, contact Dr. Nancy Herbst of Union City Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery as soon as possible. Her 25 years of practice throughout New Jersey has helped many patients of all ages with a variety of oral health problems. Her office uses only the latest cutting-edge dental technology available to ensure you have an excellent dental experience. Contact us today at (201) 601-9262 to schedule your appointment today!


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24/Jun/2019

If you’re embarrassed to show your teeth every time you take a picture, then you might believe you have a bite problem of some kind. However, you may not know exactly what type of bite problem or what corrective measures are available to fix it. The right dentist can typically diagnose the issue and repair your smile so you can start feeling confident again.

You should educate yourself on the most common issues before you see a dentist, so if you have any specific concerns, you can address them with your doctor right then and there. At the same time, dental problems are challenging to self-diagnose, so the only way you’ll know for sure is by visiting your local dental professional.

Crowding

As its name might suggest, crowding occurs when there are too many teeth in the space provided by the mouth. Many different factors result in a full smile, but it’s likely a genetic issue that you were born with. Most dentists catch this condition early on, during childhood. However, if you never received a remedy for this situation, you’ll be happy to know that it’s a common problem that many people are susceptible to. Luckily, treatment is more than possible.

Spacing

Similar to crowding, spacing occurs when the teeth are too small against the more extensive form of mouth or jaw. This situation can leave large gaps between the teeth that can leave you feeling insecure about your smile. Spacing can also occur when teeth are missing. Because teeth rely on one another, if a tooth is missing, then it increases the chance of other teeth falling out, so the spacing issue becomes prevalent.

Overjet

Commonly believed to be a result of a child who sucks their thumb too long or too often, an overjet bite occurs when the upper teeth stick out far over the bottom row of teeth. Thumbsucking isn’t the only culprit here though. It can also be a result of a jaw that is too large compared to the lower jaw.

Overbite

This bite problem exists when the front teeth sit just over the bottom front teeth. The issue arises when the bottom teeth cut into the gums of the upper teeth, causing difficulty chewing and biting into food. A dentist can usually fix an overbite issue with braces, but a severe problem may require surgery.

Treating Common Bite Problems

Although there are many types of common bite issues, Union City Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is here to help you get it treated. We offer a free consultation to assess what type of oral care services you need. Our more than 25 years of experience practicing surgery has given us a greater understanding of treatment options available to get your dental health where you want it to be. To learn more about the different procedures we offer and set up your consultation, please schedule online or call (201) 601-9262.


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24/Jun/2019

You may have been told as a child to brush your teeth twice a day and to floss regularly. Whether you followed that advice or not is another story, but there are quite a few reasons as to why you should make your oral health a top priority. It’s as important as any other health issue. There have been many studies that show how oral well-being affects your body overall, from your posture to the daily aches and pains you experience.

Certain Bite Problems

There are many common bite problems that you may not think twice about that could be affecting the rest of your body, like:

  • Crooked teeth
  • An over or underbite
  • Dental bridges or crowns that don’t fit quite right
  • Missing teeth
  • Chipped or broken teeth

What begins as a small problem quickly evolves into a much larger problem if left untreated. Any of the above issues can misalign your jaw, and since your jaw is right at the top of your body, any damage in that region causes a domino effect. Damage to the teeth or jaw-area causes headaches, earaches, and even lower back pain.

Missing Teeth Affect Your Posture

Missing teeth or teeth that are misaligned can cause the joint itself to become misaligned. When that occurs, the muscles and tissues that work together to make that jaw function are working overtime. This can place a great deal of stress on the jaw and surrounding muscles. In particular, the muscles of your neck can become strained.

From the missing or misaligned tooth, the jaw begins to have problems. The strain caused by the jaw also strains the muscles in your neck. Since the neck is so firmly attached to your head and back, you may start to experience frequent headaches. It may even cause cases of insomnia. A strained jaw and neck can also force your body to have bad posture. When your spine isn’t aligned correctly, it cuts down on the efficiency of blood circulation. Your body can no longer receive nutrients with ease, and you suddenly find your body in a considerable amount of pain.

All of this can stem from a simple misalignment of your teeth. Luckily, there are treatments available to keep your teeth in check, so the rest of your body doesn’t pay the price. A dentist might suggest implementing a procedure like orthodontics. For those who have developed TMD, there are plenty of treatments available to improve your jaw.

Getting Treatment for Your Bite

Many types of postural problems receive physical therapy as a treatment, but since your head, neck, and shoulders influence your bite, dental therapy should be included in your treatment. This makes it very important to find a reputable New Jersey oral and maxillofacial surgeon to evaluate, diagnose, and create a corrective plan for your bite.

Dr. Nancy Herbst of Union City Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery has the expertise and works with the most up-to-date technology to help correct your bite. She has over 25 years of experience and dedicates herself to treating every patient with top priority. This earned her recognition as one of New Jersey’s top dentist’s of 2016. Contact her office today at (201) 601-9262 or request more information online. One of our helpful staff members can help you set up a consultation and get you on the path to a healthy mouth and life.


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24/Jun/2019

Whether it is genetic or just a bad habit of not brushing regularly, you may be facing oral and maxillofacial surgery. The best person to talk to is your dental professional. The surgeon’s office is happy to answer any questions you have, as their goal is to make sure you’re informed before you sit down for any medical procedure.

Just like any surgery, there will be a certain level of pain and discomfort. Your doctor will give you a strict regimen as you get ready to go under the knife. It’s vital to your health to follow your specialist’s advice. If you have any other health problems, you should let the medic know so that they can prepare you properly. Only your MD can tell you if you’ll need antibiotics before or after.

When is Oral Surgery Necessary?

Typically, it is given to treat specific diseases, injuries, and other defects in the oral region, including the mouth, head, neck, face, and jaw. In some cases, you may require maxillofacial surgery if your teeth are difficult to remove or extract. This condition could be a result of an injury to your face or jaw. In other cases, it may be for a cosmetic benefit, mainly if you’re looking to improve your cheek structure or are interested in a lip injection. One other reason you may seek oral and maxillofacial surgery is if your jaw is malfunctioning and causes conditions like sleep apnea or other problems.

The Choice of Antibiotics

Antibiotics serve to fight back against infection and bacteria that may be lurking in your mouth. After all, mouths are packed full of bacteria. While a significant number of these bacteria help the mouth break down food, some of them can become invasive and make your body ill. As a result, antibiotics are brought in to fight that infection and keep the bacteria from further causing harm to your body.

Regarding oral and maxillofacial surgery, the use of antibiotics is not always necessary. If you have certain health conditions, then your surgeon may suggest that you take a prescribed amount of antibiotics before the surgery. People who have heart conditions will likely have to take meds before going under the knife.

Talk With Your Surgeon

If you are a healthy individual, you might not need to take antibiotics. Taking medicine before your surgery may end up causing a bit more harm than good. Since bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics, the more you flood your body with antibiotics, the more likely it is the bacteria will become immune to it. By speaking with your surgeon, you can determine whether antibiotics will be necessary.

Union City Oral Surgery has over 25 years of experience performing oral surgery and can give you trustworthy care advice regarding your follow-up care and the use of antibiotics. Call our office today at (201) 601-9262 with your questions regarding oral surgery and aftercare requirements.

We are happy to discuss your dental health needs and set up an appointment for you with one of our experienced staff members. You can also get more information about our surgery group and conveniently make an appointment online here.


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24/Jun/2019

Tooth loss has a significant impact on oral health, appearance, and self-esteem. We know we need to brush and floss regularly, but we’re often less aware of other steps we should take to protect our teeth. If you’re concerned about tooth loss, avoid these four common causes that aren’t mentioned often.

1. Acidic Foods

Your mouth takes about an hour to return to a balanced acidity level after you eat. When you regularly snack on sweets, the acid levels in your mouth remain high and don’t have a chance to recalibrate, which dramatically raises the risk of tooth decay. If you do have a sweet snack, eat it in one sitting and brush and floss immediately afterward.

2. High-Impact Sports

If you play football, rugby, hockey, or another high-impact sport, you could quickly knock out a tooth if you don’t wear a properly-fitted mouthguard. If you do lose a tooth during a game, store it in milk and go straight to the dentist to potentially have it replaced.

3. Grinding Your Teeth

Those of us who grind or clench our teeth may not even be aware of this habit. Over time, this grinding motion can wear away the enamel of your teeth and damage the surrounding bone, tissue, and gum. Grinding can be related to anxiety or stress or could signify an underlying bite problem, so it’s important to be evaluated by your dentist.

4. Poor Oral Hygiene and Smoking

You’re more likely to develop gum disease if you smoke, which increases your risk of losing teeth. If you don’t brush and floss twice a day as recommended and you’re a smoker, you’re putting yourself in double jeopardy. Breaking these bad habits can make a positive impact on your overall oral health.

Tooth loss is more common among men and those older than age 35. Chronic illnesses, including arthritis, diabetes, and high blood pressure, are also risk factors.

Protect Your Teeth with Oral Surgery

If you do lose a tooth, help is available. Your dentist can determine whether you’re a candidate for a dental implant, which looks natural and has the same function as your real teeth. Dr. Nancy Herbst of Union City Oral Surgery strives to provide quality care for those needing dental implants, having more than 25 years of experience conducting such surgeries. Contact us at (201) 601-9262 or schedule an appointment on our web page.


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24/Jun/2019

If your dentist has recommended removal of a diseased or damaged tooth, you’re probably concerned about the impact of a missing tooth on your appearance. When your tooth gets removed, the procedure leaves a small hole in the gums and jawbone that can lead to oral health complications. Fortunately, you may be a candidate for an advanced socket preservation procedure that prevents recession of the jawbone and may facilitate the placement of a dental implant or traditional bridge.

Benefits of Socket Preservation

The roots of your teeth have multiple functions. In addition to holding your teeth in place, they signal your jawbone to produce new bone cells. If a root is infected, your jawbone and the bony ridge behind your gums will begin to deteriorate. Without treatment, this problem changes the structure of your face, alters the fit of your dental bridge, and may make it impossible for your dental surgeon to place implants.

How Socket Preservation Works

After clearing away your tooth, the surgeon will graft new bone onto your jawbone to immediately ward off damage. He or she will place a fibrin membrane into the bone, which includes platelets that stimulate the healing process. Next, natural or synthetic bone is put into the socket and possibly treated with a platelet-rich plasma to further stimulate healing. Small sutures may be added to hold everything in place once the gum tissue closes over the incision. This treatment not only helps restore the jawbone but also prevents a painful condition called dry socket that occurs when the nerve is exposed.

Recovering from Socket Preservation

The grafted bone tissue will gradually integrate with the surrounding jawbone over a few months. Once this process is complete, you may be a candidate for stable, durable dental implants. You need a healthy jawbone with enough tissue to support the implant for a successful implant procedure. When you follow your dentist’s post-procedure instructions carefully, you will likely recover from socket preservation without significant complications.

If you need to have a tooth removed and are concerned about your long-term dental health, visit a socket preservation specialist at Union City Oral Surgery as soon as possible. These surgeons can take the necessary steps to restore the health of your jawbone after an extraction. Call us at (201) 601-9262 or schedule an appointment today on our web page.


Union City Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, P.C.

Nancy Herbst, DDS

311 33rd Street
Union City, NJ 07087

Phone: 201-601-9262

Service Areas

Nancy Herbst, DDS is easily accessible to Manhattan and serves the following New Jersey and New York communities:

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